A Dancer's Reflections from the Lesbos Refugee Camps

By Livia Vanaver

What are the really hard questions? How to conduct the research? When do we step in or step back? How do we create an atmosphere conducive to sharing? How to create the space for people to come forth? 

These were very real questions for me as I began to observe over and over again how I needed to feel a connection in myself in order to connect with one person through their eyes, their voices and really listen to them. How do dance and music connect us from the deepest level?  And first, how do we conduct ourselves and what preparation do we need in order to have the best 'laboratory' and make experiments? How were we actually going to find two or three musicians and/or dancers in these camps? How would we keep communicating with them over the next two to three years as they traveled to find their new homes? This was our mission.

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Dislocations: An Iranian Composer in Lesbos

Dislocations: An Iranian Composer in Lesbos

By Andy Teirstein

Viewed with a cold historical eye, it is clear that global dislocation is a key ingredient in the evolution of the arts. Would we have flamenco without the juxtaposition of migrating Roma, Arabs and Jews in Southern Spain? Imagine music without the blues (and by extension: jazz and rock), a result of the forced displacement of a multitude of West Africans. When two disparate elements come together, a fusion takes place, and a new creative force is unleashed. In this time of dislocation on a historic scale, when the “global village” has become disfracted beyond recognition from its quaint image in Marshall McLuhan’s The Medium Is the Massage (1967), the arts have arrived at a state of hyper-fusion. 

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